Guest Experts

Are You Ready for the “Youth Pill”?

Posted on: August 22nd, 2015 by Acara-Admin-01

youthpill

We have discovered a pill that actually slows the rate of aging in animals. What if we had a preventive drug that slows the rate of aging in Humans? We would be able to not only manage heart disease but other conditions that cause dementia, cancer, Type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Even cosmetic changes that go with aging could be addressed. This will have a profound effect on the practice of medicine.

Learn more as Dr. J interviews author of the Youth Pill, David Stipp.

Listen on your phone click here.

 

David Stipp has written about science, medicine, the environment and biotech since 1982 for Scientific AmericanThe Wall Street Journal, Fortune, New York TimesScience and other publications. He led Fortune‘s science and medical coverage from 1995 to 2005 as a senior writer, and from 1982 to 1995 covered science and medicine as a staff reporter at The Wall Street Journal. Since the late 1990s he has written extensively on the science of aging. During his career he has also covered, among other things, the Pentagon’s growing concern about the risk of abrupt climate change, the application of Darwin to medicine, childhood lead poisoning, new treatments for impotence, animal intelligence, and the effects of birth order on personality. In 2014, he won the American Aging Association’s Excellence in Journalism Award. In 1998 he won a National Association of Science Writers’ award for best magazine article, and in 1993-4 served as a Knight Fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
http://www.davidstipp.com/ 

Reviews from the site: "From the title of the book, I expected hype about resveratrol or some other miracle pill; but instead it is a nuanced, levelheaded, entertaining, informative account of the history and current state of longevity research. It makes that research come alive by telling stories about the people involved, the failures and setbacks, and the agonizingly slow process of teasing out the truth with a series of experiments that often seem to contradict each other."  --Dr. Harriet Hall, Science-Based Medicine